Beatles - Magical Mystery Tour

Magical Mystery Tour: A playlist of influence…

Published on October 18th, 2012 | Jonny Abrams

The recent re-release of The Beatles’ Magical Mystery Tour film had Rocksucker going back to the album for a thousandth listen or so, and our desire to write about this glorious work without repeating what’s been said a million times already – dig the rampant exaggeration  – led us to have a think about which of our favourite recordings from the last three decades remind us of a track from Magical Mystery Tour, and why. This is what we came up with…

“Magical Mystery Tour”

Supergrass – “Going Out”

Ecstatic acid harmonies; giddy psychedelia; revelling in the freedom opened up by its own grinning possibilities.

“The Fool on the Hill”

Gorky’s Zygotic Mynci – “Miss Trudy”

Wistful woodwind; playful character portrayal with a devastatingly melancholic core.

“Flying”

The Flaming Lips – “Approaching Pavonis Mons by Balloon”

Positively airborne; triumphant yet gentle trajectory; ever so warm and fluffy

“Blur Jay Way”

The Olivia Tremor Control – “Can You Come Down With Us?”

Claustrophobic psychedelia; ominously hushed vocal; a paranoid fog upon LA (or, in The Olivia Tremor Control’s case, Athens, Georgia).

“Your Mother Should Know”

The Divine Comedy – “A Woman of the World”

Slyly swinging would-be Gershwin number that weaves in and out of keys, throws in some campy backing vocals and occasionally clears the way for minor-key water-gazing.

“I Am the Walrus”

The Apples in Stereo – “Strawberryfire”

Slow, authoritatively clattering drums (okay, Ringo drums); detached, lysergic vocal delivery.

…or any song you’ve ever heard that has uses the cello psychedelically.

“Hello, Goodbye”

Blur – “Tracy Jacks”

Hits planes of easy-going rapture inaccessible to most bands; beautiful use of overlapping vocals parts; extended instrumental outro.

“Strawberry Fields Forever”

Gomez – “We Haven’t Turned Around (X-ray)”

Should be fairly obvious, this one.

“Penny Lane”

Pugwash – “It’s Nice to Be Nice”

Trotting, chiming piano chords; all-round air of the ridiculously in love with life; Thomas Walsh’s ever-so-McCartney-ish line “…and did you hear about so-and-so?”

“Baby You’re a Rich Man”

Cornershop – “Sleep on the Left Side”

Lightest and brightest of grooves; Indian influences assimilated seamlessly; dizzyingly high and funky with it.

“All You Need is Love”

Super Furry Animals – “For Now and Ever”

A vampish, ridiculously loved-up drunken sway; triumphant and final; as playfully embracing as can be.

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About the Author

Editor of Rocksucker and the website's founder, Jonny is passionate about the music he listens to, both good and bad, as well as interviewing his favourite musicians.


  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/17500870954029985716 Thomas Brailli

    Interesting idea. I will give the songs I haven’t heard a listen. Sleep On The Left Side is a belter so you obviously know what you are talking about.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/07159042342527799488 Rocksucker.co.uk

    “Sleep On the Left Side” just came on the radio literally about a minute after I saw your post. Weird!